Learn how to make quilling paper squares and other angular shapes || www.thepaperycraftery.com

So far, in this quilling for beginners series, we’ve tackled basic coils and curvy shapes, such as teardrops and marquise.

Let’s now move on to another part of quilling: how to make paper squares and other angular shapes.

But first, grab your copy of my quilling paper shapes printable so you can follow along!




Learn how to make quilling paper squares and other angular shapes || www.thepaperycraftery.com

Now, to be perfectly honest, these shapes are not something I use in my quilling work very often.

I don’t have a real reason. I’ve just always been drawn to circles and swirls!

Nevertheless, quilling paper squares are an important skill to master, especially if you’re looking to be a accredited member of an quilling organization, like the North American Quilling Guild.

To start all the following shapes, you’ll first want to roll loose coils.

A quilling paper square is formed by pinching either side of the coil in an even way.

Rotate the pinched coil 90 degrees to pinch the other 2 sides, keeping an consistent space between all angles.

Keep the shape as is and its a diamond. Or, spread the outer layers of paper out to create a square.

Learn how to make quilling paper squares and other angular shapes || www.thepaperycraftery.comTo make a rectangle, simply adjust the spacing between the pinched sides so they are not so evenly spaced all around.

Learn how to make quilling paper squares and other angular shapes || www.thepaperycraftery.com




A quilling paper triangle is created by pinching 3 sides of a coil.

From a loose coil, gently squeeze one side, then spin and pinch in two more places. All types of triangles would be made the same way.Learn how to make quilling paper squares and other angular shapes || www.thepaperycraftery.com

Another common angular shape is the arrow.

The arrow is similar to a triangle because it has 3 angles.

Start with a strong squeeze on one side. Rotate 90 degrees and make 2 smaller pinches, close together, on the other side.
Bend the end with the 2 close angles around your quilling tool to create the peaked effect.
Learn how to make quilling paper squares and other angular shapes || www.thepaperycraftery.com

The angled marquise also starts with a deep squeeze on one end of a loose coil.

Rotate and make a slightly gentler pinch on the opposite end.
Next, spin your shape so the first 2 pinches are top and bottom. Using both hands at the same time, make 2 more small pinches on either side of the last angle.Learn how to make quilling paper squares and other angular shapes || www.thepaperycraftery.com

The last quilling paper shape for now is the bunny ear.

A bunny ear is a loose coil with 2 small pinches next to each other on one end. I think this one looks more like a cat, but that might just be me. Slightly deeper squeezes are also traditional on the bunny ear.Learn how to make quilling paper squares and other angular shapes || www.thepaperycraftery.com

Note: there is a variation on the bunny ear called the lily of the valley. For this, bend the two peaks out away from the coil slightly.

There are a few more obscure quilling shapes: maybe I’ll share them too one day.

Keep an eye out for future posts on making paper scrolls and swirls!

But, for now, keep on quilling!